Nicholas Mcgegan

Announcing 2010-11 – Our 30th Anniversary Season


Today, we announced our 30th Anniversary Season!

Current subscribers can renew their subscriptions now! General public subscriptions go on sale March 15th! Single tickets go on sale August 5th. Keep checking our website, more information will be up in the coming weeks. If you can’t wait… you can always join us this weekend for Brahms (just in time for Valentine’s)!


Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra and Chorale’s
2010-11 Season
* – Philharmonia Baroque premiere
† – Philharmonia Baroque debut

September – Robert Levin plays Mozart

Friday 24 September Herbst Theatre, San Francisco
Saturday 25 September First Congregational Church, Berkeley
Sunday 26 September First Congregational Church, Berkeley
Tuesday 28 September Menlo-Atherton Performing Arts Center, Atherton
Wednesday 29 September Lesher Center for the Arts, Walnut Creek

Nicholas McGegan, conductor
Robert Levin, fortepiano (below)

MOZART
Incidental Music from Thamos, King of Egypt *
Concerto for Fortepiano No. 20 in D minor, K. 466 *
Fragments of newly found works for Fortepiano and Orchestra (U.S. Premiere)
Symphony No. 41 in C major, KV 551 “Jupiter” (Last performed by Philharmonia Baroque on March 2001)


October – Bach’s Wedding Cantata
Friday 15 October Herbst Theatre, San Francisco
Saturday 16 October First Congregational Church, Berkeley
Sunday 17 October First Congregational Church, Berkeley
Tuesday 19 October Menlo-Atherton Performing Arts Center, Atherton

Lars Ulrik Mortensen, conductor and harpsichord (below) †
Maria Keohane, soprano †

BACH
Orchestral Suite No. 1 in C major, BWV 1066
Concerto for Harpsichord in D minor, BWV 1052
Weichet nur, betrübte Schatten,” Wedding Cantata, BWV 202 (February 1982 – Philharmonia Baroque’s first public concert)
Concerto for Harpsichord in D major, BWV 1054


November – Vivaldi’s Four Seasons

Friday 5 November Herbst Theatre, San Francisco
Saturday 6 November First Congregational Church, Berkeley
Sunday 7 November First Congregational Church, Berkeley
Tuesday 9 November Menlo-Atherton Performing Arts Center, Atherton
Wednesday 10 November Lesher Center for the Arts, Walnut Creek

Nicholas McGegan, conductor
Elizabeth Blumenstock, violin (concertmaster)

VIVALDI The Four Seasons, Op. 8, Nos. 1-4 (March 1991)
CORELLI Concerto Grosso Op. 6, No. 11 in B-flat major
PERGOLESI Sinfonia in F major *
DURANTE Concerto No. 5 in A major *
ZAVATERI Concerto decimo a Pastorale, Op. 1 *


December – Handel’s Messiah
Friday 3 December Herbst Theatre, San Francisco
Saturday 4 December First Congregational Church, Berkeley
Sunday 5 December First Congregational Church, Berkeley
Tuesday 7 December Menlo-Atherton Performing Arts Center, Atherton

Nicholas McGegan, conductor
Daniel Taylor, countertenor
John McVeigh, tenor
Tyler Duncan, bass †
Philharmonia Chorale, Bruce Lamott, director
TBA soprano

HANDEL Messiah (December 2002)


January – David Daniels

Saturday 15 January First Congregational Church, Berkeley
Sunday 16 January First Congregational Church, Berkeley
Tuesday 18 January Menlo-Atherton Performing Arts Center, Atherton
Friday 21 January Herbst Theatre, San Francisco

Nicholas McGegan, conductor
David Daniels, countertenor (below)

VIVALDI Stabat mater, RV 621 *
HANDEL Arias from Giulio Cesare
TELEMANN Suite in F major, TWV 55:F11 “Alster Overture” *


February – Hummel’s Concerto for Keyed Trumpet
Friday 11 February Herbst Theatre, San Francisco
Saturday 12 February First Congregational Church, Berkeley
Sunday 13 February First Congregational Church, Berkeley
Tuesday 15 February Menlo-Atherton Performing Arts Center, Atherton

Nicholas McGegan, conductor
Gabriele Cassone, keyed trumpet (below)†

SPOHR Symphony No. 2 in D minor, Op. 49 *
HUMMEL Concerto for Keyed Trumpet in E major *
MENDELSSOHN Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 11 *


March – Flicka!
Friday 4 March Herbst Theatre, San Francisco
Saturday 5 March First Congregational Church, Berkeley
Sunday 6 March First Congregational Church, Berkeley
Tuesday 8 March Menlo-Atherton Performing Arts Center, Atherton
Wednesday 9 March Lesher Center for the Arts, Walnut Creek

Nicholas McGegan, conductor
Frederica von Stade, mezzo-soprano (below)†

REBEL Les Caractères de la danse *
Nathaniel STOOKEY Into the Bright Lights (poetry by Flicka) (U.S. Premiere)
RAMEAU Les Indes galantes suite d’orchestre
GLUCK Arias


April – Haydn’s Creation
Friday 8 April Herbst Theatre, San Francisco
Saturday 9 April First Congregational Church, Berkeley
Sunday 10 April First Congregational Church, Berkeley
Tuesday 12 April Menlo-Atherton Performing Arts Center, Atherton
Wednesday 13 April Lesher Center for the Arts, Walnut Creek

Nicholas McGegan, conductor
Dominique Labelle, soprano
Thomas Cooley, tenor
Philharmonia Chorale, Bruce Lamott, director

HAYDN The Creation (April 1994)


Celebrating 30 Years of Inspired Sound
When Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra of the West played the first notes of Johann Sebastian Bach’s Wedding Cantata at Herbst Theatre on February 4, 1982, no one guessed what the future would hold. At the time, just having formed the first period instrument ensemble on the West Coast was a feat in itself. By the mid-1970s, a small community of musicians and craftsmen had converged on the Bay Area, all inspired by a countercultural phenomenon: the early music movement. It was not until a fateful moment in 1977 that the true power of this rediscovered period of music was realized at a summer camp on the Russian River—a roomful of these musicians played together as an ensemble, on period instruments, for the very first time. They produced a sound so full of life, expression, exuberance, clarity and subtlety that it seemed to vibrate from the hearts and minds of the composers.

The moment was so moving, so unique, that one musician—Laurette Goldberg—became obsessed with creating an orchestra that would be able to recreate the richness, brilliance, flexibility and articulation that the composers of the Baroque and early Classical periods intended. Laurette spent five years bringing together a group of people who would support the musicians who became Philharmonia Baroque. At thetime, her ideas were radical—a chamber orchestra, Baroque and early-Classical repertoire, period instruments, but her desire was not—to create something meaningful, affecting, transcendent.

Since the very beginning, Philharmonia Baroque has been about the love of a sound—a sound, once heard, that changes once and for all the way we want to experience music, whether on stage or in the audience. This inspiration has guided Philharmonia Baroque from the start, and the organization’s ultimate goal has remained constant since its inception 30 years ago: we want our music to delight, to inspire and to educate—to increase the level of beauty, sensitivity and joy in a complex world.

We hope to see you this season and next!